Change in game plan, need new recipe

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MayaN
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Change in game plan, need new recipe

So I had a lightbulb moment (two actually) , about why my grayest root areas were  staying so stubbornly orange despite using ashey fruit acids and adequate processing time.  It's partly because the "grayest roots" are right where I happen to part my hair, so they were just more evident there, upon closer inspection they actually aren't all THAT much grayer than the roots elsewhere on my head.  

Also, before I started trying to color-correct my roots, I had already stained my entire head 3 times with henna (over the past 3 or 4 months) trying to get to my goal color (not realizing at the time that I was already there,  just not used to my hair looking so different in the bright sun).  The third whole-head application was with a henndigo gloss (very small amount indigo) that had come up way too dark, and although I managed to lighten it up a LOT with your coconut oil advice, and with honey lightening, it never quite got as light as its formery coppery self.  And it continues to deepen a bit!... I didn't realize that an acidic henna mixure would just keep getting subtly deeper , even after the two week mark.  So no wonder my fresh silver roots were having such a hard time catching up!  

Anyway, in light of the above two insights, I think that switching to full-strength Twilight henna might be shortsighted for me... I'm sure you're absolutely right that it would bring by roots deep enough to match the lengths, which is what I said was bothering me.  But my goal color has always been medium golden copper, not the deeper auburn I have now.  So I'm realizing that if I keep staining the roots a deeper auburn with Twilight, yes it'll all look more uniform, but it won't be shade I had in mind.  

My natural hair color is a graying neutral medium brown that used to be much warmer in my youth.  And I know that henna can't lighten hair... so the only hope of me achiveing a golden copper look is for the grays throughout my hair to become lighter copper highlights, as my gray roots grow in (I originally hennaed over color teated hair).  

So, I'm thinking there is just no real way around the "brighter roots" problem for right now, till they grow in and don't look like "roots" anymore, and begin to look more like highlights.  I do have a good temporary brush-on hair powder in auburn that I can use to make the roots look less obvious as they grow in.  

With all this in mind (and I know I've been a royal pest, but maybe others can learn from your patient advice), I need a new recipe.   

 I no longer want to make two different henna recipes, one for the grayest roots, one for the salt and pepper roots.  Mainly because when I looked closely at the roots all over my head I noticed that the gray percentage is beginning to increase now, even in the back.  So rather than stress out over exactly where to put each recipe, I'm gonna try to make do with just ONE henna root recipe.    My pan is to use the same recipe as an all-over gloss (mixed with lots of conditioner) if and when my more auburn color on the lengths fades (or can be further lightened with coconut oil).

So I need a recipe (henna/cassia, I'm guessing) that will make the grays a nice vivid (but not neon) golden copper or straight up copper,  while at the same time having enough dye-power to make the neutral medium brown strands pop up to a warm coppery red, the lighter the better, so there will be less contrast with the copper stained grays.  I have heard that adding cinnamon to the mix, since it's got some natural peroxide in it, will help lift the brown a little lighter.  There are comparison photos of that online, with a control sample that had no cinnamon added,  and the results look pretty convincing, so I'm thinking of patch testing it.    

I am thinking a neutral (rather than acidic) mix would be better for my color goal, so that it doesn't darken as much over time?  Or maybe a mix that is barely acidic?  I definitely want to avoid progressive darkening, to the extent possible.  

I do understand (thanks to your website!) that a neutral mix will fade, that is fine with me, because I have found it MUCH easier to refresh faded areas with a gloss or a re-application, rather than to try to lighten up henna as it darkens over time.  The whole natural lightening effort is like a part time job, haha.  So I don't mind having to reapply henna if it fades, although I would like it to stick to my grays for at least a few weeks at a time, till the new roots come in.  

The acidic (amla) recipe (80% Jasmine, 20% cassia) that I'm using now is sticking GREAT to my grays and in no way knocks down too much of the copper tones, it's still bright! (suddenly a GOOD thing, now that I've changed my game plan) but the amla is making the browns look dull, not coppery enough.  And when I switch to copperberry the browns look nice and vivid, but the grays look RED, not copper.  So, if you think I'll need an acidic component, I guess I need one that strikes a balance between warm and cool, and won't darken much over time?  I have no idea what that would be.  I'd rather just use an herb tea like chamomile, to avoid the whole darkening scenario, and see if I can still get good gray cover that way, unless you think that's a bad plan.  

I'm also very willing to mix the Jasmine and Twilight hennas, if you think that'd be the ideal dye content for me, or add more or less cassia.  There is a woman online who swears by mixing your Jamine with a bit of Twilight for a lovely result that stays coppery but packs a bit more punch on brown hairs than Jasmine alone.  So for my root recipe I was thinking to try 50g Jasmine, 25g Twilight, 25g Cassia, with Chamomile tea brewed with cinnamon sticks and also with some cardamom pods for the high antioxidant value.  But before I even patch test that, I wanted to see if you think it  even makes sense, or have a better idea.  I realize it'd be (I think) a neutral mix, but I could add a half cup apple juice to it if you think I need something more acidic.  

SO many thanks!  As a small token of thanks for all your help, I'd like to know if you take donations to the website.  If not, perhaps you should consider it!  It's truly a public service to have all of this free and reliable info in one place!     

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

enissel
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Roots

Hello,

Yes you will need something acidic to dye release the henna. Apple juice works great. It is very gentle on the hair and scalp. Nightfall Rose fruit acid adds subtle ash tones. Not as many ash tones as the amla and not as dark as the malluma kristalovino. I think this would be a good fruit acid for you to try.

If the hair is getting dull it may be due to hard water buildup. Using a clarifying shampoo or rainwash before you henna and once a week can remove this mineral buildup.

Have you checked out our blog? We have a new article on roots that may be helpful. Here is the link. http://www.ancientsunrise.blog/full-coverage-roots/

This one may be helpful as well as it contains information about why the henna color contains to darken over time. http://www.ancientsunrise.blog/full-coverage-darkening/

MayaN
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Last seen: 1 week 3 days ago
Joined: 2017-04-16 04:10
follow up question

Thank you!  I hadn't considered Nightfall Rose, interesting idea.    I'm already a user of the Rain Wash, but only before hennaing.  I will try it between henna applications too.  Yes, I had already read the blog article on roots, but hadn't seen the second article you mentioned... I just gave it a read, it was helpful, thank you!  I'm curious about your advice about something acid being needed in the mix, to "release the dye".... I thought I read an article somewhere on this site that said that neutral mixes (such as with water or herbal teas) are also fine for staining hair, and will not start off quite as bright as an acidic mix (so perhaps better for root touch-ups, then?... as far as minimizing the "hot roots" problem).   I know that neutral mixes may fade more over time but I think that the fading "problem" may actually be a plus for me, since (except at the root) my henna tends to go dark (probably because my hair is porous).  Anway, my understanding was that henna will dye release with or without acid, and many say they get great stain without acid , so now I'm a bit confused, could you clarify?  Were you maybe recommending an acidic mix because I have gray and acid will (?) help make sure the henna covers the gray?  Thanks so much for your help!  

enissel
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Last seen: 15 hours 46 min ago
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Joined: 2016-09-07 09:47
Roots

Hello,

Read chapter 6 about acidic mixes. It goes into the science of why a fruit acid or fruit juice is needed for the henna to dye release and effectively bind to the keratin in the hair.  It also discusses why different fruit juices and fruit acids give slightly different shades, depending on the ph of the acid used.

http://www.tapdancinglizard.com/AS_henna_for_hair/Chapter_6_Henna_and_Ac...

 

 

MayaN
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Last seen: 1 week 3 days ago
Joined: 2017-04-16 04:10
Thanks

Thanks , I did read that article before, but it has soo much info in it that I missed a few points the first time around, so it was helpful.  Thanks again!

 

enissel
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Last seen: 15 hours 46 min ago
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Joined: 2016-09-07 09:47
Thanks

You are welcome!

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