indigo sticking to hair that wasn't dyed?

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MayaN
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indigo sticking to hair that wasn't dyed?

Hi, my henna recipe for my 75% gray/25% dark brown roots is 80% twilight henna/20% cassia mixed with amla.  This is giving me great gray cover, and a beautiful copper red (my goal color) in indoor lighting but outdoors, oh my goodness, it's very orange, even weeks after oxidizing.  I'd like to tone it down a bit, meaning brown it up just a tad.   I tried several different solutions over the past year to try to achieve this, but nothing really worked till I added a very small amount (10%) of indigo to my recipe.  I was scared to try that, since I'd had an indigo mishap in the past, but that little 10% made just the right difference.  The color is now still very copper but not neon copper.  Perfect. 

I applied this new recipe to my roots only, being careful not to expose any of the lenths to the dye. But believe it or not, my lengths turned out considerably darker in certain places.  I thought, how could THAT have possibly happened?  I never had that problem at all, before adding indigo to my recipe (and yes, I buy all my supplies here).  My theory is that as I was rinsing out the mud (I use a shower, not a tub soak), the indigo portion of my recipe must have "stuck" (?) to the more porous areas of my lengths.   How can I prevent that happening next time?  Would coating my lengths with oil help? 

If I decide not to use indigo any more, would switching from Amla to Blueberry juice give me a shade that's closer to what the 10% of indigo is doing?  Meaning, is blueberry juice more "browning" than amla?  I am definitely not wanting to go darker or veer off into "cool" red (rose/burgandy) territory, I want to stay golden copper, just not quite so bright.  Adding more cassia or switching to a lower dye content (Jasmine) did not help, that just made it a lighter shade of bright orange. 

Thanks! 

Maya

 

 

enissel
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Indigo

Hello,

Coating the lengths of the hair in an oil, conditioner or moisturizer will help make sure that the Indigo only sticks to the areas of the hair that you apply it too and nothing else. Blueberry juice is very similar to using Amla powder. I would try Apple Cider Vinegar, it tends to have a browning effect of the Henna once it oxidizes.

MayaN
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Last seen: 4 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 2017-04-16 04:10
thanks!

 I will try the oil tip if I decide to go back to using a little indigo in the recipe.  I don't like how unpredictable that dye is on my hair, though.  I'm careful to blend it well with my (dye released) henna... I've even used a blender... in small amounts at a time, so I can apply it before the indigo demises, but I still get a patchy result.   

So for now I'm sticking with just the Twilight henna, which I mix with just 20% cassia and some fairly strong melissa balm (lemon tea) water... it's pH neutral, but I add a bit of aloe vera juice to it, which makes it pH 4-5 (tested it), dpeending how much I add.   I used to use amla instead of tea, but I noticed no color difference between the two--- amla doesn't seem to have a browning effect for me.  So maybe I will try blueberry juice. 

I hear you about the AC Vinegar, I am sure that might work to make it go browner since it's so acidic.  But for me that's a real slippery slope, because my hair is past my shoulders now and I'm wanting to grow it long... and what I'm noticing that those previously hennaned lengths and ends just keep getting darker.  Even though I do only root touch ups. 

I have tried using clarifying shampoos and rain wash on the ends, and finally even tried natural lightening methods followed by a henna gloss, to try to restore them to copper...  that helped only some--  they are just determined to be a browny-y auburn.   I think maybe that's partly because when I did my initial henna application, I used an acidic mix (amla) -- I have heard that often makes the "browning effect" just keep getting browner over time, is that correct?  Personally I'd rather have my henna fade over time and then just re-apply it, rather than have the ends just keep getting darker.  I do not use any heat tools on my hair, so I know that's not the problem.

The "reverse ombre" look (the older, more oxidized hair on the bottom being darker than the newly hennaed hair on the top) is not as bad as it sounds... the ombre effect is gradual, so it's wearable... but I am trying to minimize it over time, that's why I swicthed to a recipe that's only very mildly acidic. 

So is indigo the only way to make a orangey (on gray) henna/cassia mix go slightly more copper/brown, without using amla, vinegar, or some other acidic ingredient?  Guess I'm looking for a way to make my henna recipe slightly more copper (browner), on my brown/gray  roots,  without having it go darker and darker over time, as it grows out.  Is there a way to do that? 

Someone suggested I try Nightfall Rose, but the word "rose" really scares me off, because I have (and want) a very warm/coppery/natural shade of red right now, the cooler cherry/rosey/burgundy reds do not work with my skin tone.    

Thanks,

Maya

 

 

enissel
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Darker Henna

Hello,

Henna will continue to get darker and darker over time. It is the natural oxidation of Henna. This can continue for years to come. Indigo will make the color more brown without using a more acidic liquid for dye release.

Night Fall Rose Fruit acid does not add rose tones to the Henna color. It adds a slight ash tone to cool the brighter orange tones in the Henna a little bit. It also contains antioxidants that can help keep the Henna from oxidizing so dark over time.

MayaN
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thanks!

Ok, great, sounds like the night fall rose might work for me then, I will give it a try! 

enissel
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Night Fall Rose Fruit Acid

Hello,

You will need 25g of Night Fall Rose Fruit Acid for every 100g of Henna being used. Then use distilled water as the liquid.

Let us know if you have additional questions.

 

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