Advice needed on Cassia

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eli19
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Advice needed on Cassia

I have done henna for a few years.  I tried hendigo and then 2-step process.  I always ended up with a few strands either not taking up the colour or the indigo fading quickly leaving the strand copper.  However now I have about 50% of very white hair coming out in big patches.  I am therefore considering going grey.

I have read Cassia is a great conditioner but it can leave my whites yellow.  I am an olive skin latin woman so the yellow is a no-no. Can I use Cassia for conditioning and use a "blue" shampoo to tone the yellow tones down? I also know there is something called FanciFull in silver to specifically get rid of brassiness.

m_moore
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Good evening =]

Good evening =]

Have you tried using a rainwash prior to your treatment? it can help a lot!!

http://www.mehandi.com/shop/rainwash/index.html

What is your process for a two step, including what you mix your plant powders with and your time you leave each step on for?

Cassia can, but honestly, if you just mix it with distilled water, (Rainwash is DEFINITELY recommended before cassia), and apply to your hair for an hour, it can be a great conditioning product.  You can always try a sample first, for only $1.50.

 

A blue shampoo may help...althought blue is more for orange tones and brassiness, so a violet shampoo may be best (shimmer lights is amazing).  I honestly have not tested this out to see if it helps, but consider this on my list to test!

 

eli19
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Thank you for getting back to

Thank you for getting back to me.  I am going to check the water where I live (North West England).  Is the rainwater treatment available here?

I always mixed yemeni henna with apple cider and water (or strong coffee mix) and left out about 12 hours or whatever it took to release dye.  Then applied to clean hair left on for 4-5 hours.  Then rinsed the henna out and applied the indigo freshly mixed with salty water and left on for another hour or so before rinsing it out. It gave me a decent coverage (minus the few strays which won't take colour) but the indigo fades in about two weeks.  I have to say that living in the UK where most of the year is cold and damp my house is always freezing and I found having this cold mud on my head for so many hours gave me the chills.

Anyway, after the indigo fades I'm left with bright orange (previously snow white) hair mixed with black.  It doesn't look good on me with my already yellowish skin.  In order to cover my fast growing roots and the orange I'd have to do the 2 step process every 2-3 weeks.  It's too much.

I think this is why I may just embrace the white hair (shrugs shoulders).  I didn't realise there was a blue shampoo and a violet one and that they were different.  Thanks for the heads up.

 

 

AlexandraTheGreat
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Last seen: 5 months 1 week ago
Joined: 2015-03-09 10:54
Regarding getting cold whilst henna is on head...

Living in Scotland - oh yes, I understand the heat loss through the cold mud effect! However, pile hair up on head, then cover with cling film, then a wooly hat. You can also add a layer of foil on top of cling film and then hat. You will look ridiculous of course but it really does make a difference in keeping warm, and you can get on with your day. 

Tuck toilet roll or Cotten wool under the hat brim to catch leaks , especially just behind ears. 

But the best thing to do after all of the above, and especially if you have a lot of hair and the weight is heavy is, having pre-prepared munchies, a cosy blanket and even a hot water bottle, settle down in from of a good movie or two (cover your pillow and keep extra toilet roll to hand). Don't move until it's time to wash out and consider the whole experience a self indulgent one!

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