What to add to the mix

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marie
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What to add to the mix

Hi,

I have no prior experience with henna. I'm sure people have asked this before, but there seems to be so many different things that people use in their mixes, and I was wondering if someone could just tell me straight out how the different components affect the result? I'm looking for things to use with just henna, not cassia or indigo or anything else. What things might make the color darker, lighter, redder, or deeper? How do all the different liquids people use affect the end result, and what about spices like paprika and turmeric? And cloves? I've read that acidic liquids will darken over time, while neutral mixes won't be as dark. What's the difference between using wine, vinegar, lemon juice, tea or other liquids in the end result? And if there is more dye in your hair (using a high dye content henna, leaving it in longer, hennaing multiple times) does that make your hair darker, more red, or just more intense of a color? Sorry for all the questions! :-) I have dark brown hair, if that changes anything. Thank you!

ACWN
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Re: What to add to the mix

First I really recommend you poke around the site a bit and check out the free e-book. That will really help. Lots of info

 

Hair color has a big result in what color you get in the end. The lighter your hair, the brighter it will be. The darker your hair, the darker the result will be.

 

Think of henna as a tinted wood stain. When you apply a colored stain to a light piece of wood like pine, you get a light, bright result. But if you apply the same stain to say a walnut, the result comes out deeper and darker. Henna is the same way on the hair.

 

Spices dont do anything. They stain, dont dye. The color change they give lasts only a few days at best. Same thing with coffee... just gonna give you the jitters.

 

Mixes made with lemon juice will continue to gradually darken over time, where as less acidic liquids like tea wont. Stronger acidic based liquids will also be slightly less orange the first couple of days and will darken less as they oxidize, where as less acidic liquids will be pretty orange and will seem to darken a good deal as they oxidize. The more acidic the liquid, the longer it takes and the large the window you have before the dye demises. Thats the only real differences.

 

Vinegar makes henna smell pretty foul so its not usually used around here much if at all.

Lemon juice dye releases in 8 - 12 hours, but folks have let it sit for up to 24 or 48 and have gotten excellent dye release. You also have a longer window before the dye demises.

Orange juice dye releases in about 7 - 9 hours.

Apple releases in 6 - 8.

Acidic teas dye release in 1 - 4 hours.

 

Wine I'm not sure about, its not used too often.

 

The more you use henna, the darker its going to become until it hits the saturation point - which is usually burgundy/wine. Once you have the color you want, do roots only.

 

With dark brown hair, depending on how dark we're talking, you may have no color change inside under most lighting, but outside it will flare red.

 

 

...Wow, book.. sorry!

The Ginger
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Re: What to add to the mix

I have been using Yemanese [sic] for almost 2 years now.  My natural color began as new penny but gradually darkened to auburn.  I colored it a couple of times when the grey first appeared but couldn't tolerate the effects. 

I tried henna mixed with apple cider vinegar.  Yes, it reaks but my hair has changed in texture, the dandruff is gone, and I hardly go a day without someone commenting on how beautiful my hair is.  It is the color of a used penny.  Perfect.  I was raised PA Dutch so the cider was the natural choice for me.  

Will the color really end up burgundy in the end?  This scares me a bit.  I concentrate on the roots but use the extra (in the K-up squeeze bottle) to gunk up the length.  I then throw a turban on and lay down.  Should I stop slopping the extra on the length (2'' from my heiny)? P.S. I also do my eyebrows.  Try that with the chemicals...you'll go blind.

Is there anyway to minimize the orange scalp issue?  That is where the grey is so I have no choice but to lay it thick at the roots and besides it gets rid of the dandruff.  I take off the mistakes as they happen but my hair is thin at the hairline and you can see straight through to my scalp.  I massage the area with conditioner and that seems to help fade the stain but it takes a couple of days to get rid of it.  Any suggestions?  If not I will continue to be proud of my orange scalp.  It IS worth it.

Carrie
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Re: What to add to the mix

There is no way around the orange scalp, but at least it's gone within a couple of days!

If you want to avoid going burgundy, I would skip on glossing the length, or at least only do the length a couple of times a year.

hmarah
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Re: What to add to the mix
ACWN, thank you so very much! I have been searching and researching for months regarding the addition of terps, coffee, etc, and in two paragraphs, you have given me the answers I needed.us I have converted seven people away from chemical dyes, three of them were using dyes with the dreaded PPD and wanted desperately to make sure I was doing it right for them. I cannot thank you enough. Wish us luck; all but me are henna virgins.
Cade
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Re: What to add to the mix

Hi ACWN, thanks so much for this great reply. You've got some good information in there. I'm a newbie, and just henna'ed my hair for the first time a few days ago, after spending a lot of time reading everything I could on this site and the ebook, etc. My natural hair was medium brown with about 50% gray, and the henna covered all my hair beautifully. I used pure Mehendi henna from the Indian market, the "Hesh" brand. The package ingredients said it was "100% Lawsonia Alba/Henna." It was dated 02/09, with an expiration of 01/12. I used 200g, mixed it with a little over 1 cup lemon juice, let it dye release, then thinned it with distilled water to the consistency of yogurt before application. When I tested it in the palm of my hand for 5 minutes, it did not dye my skin at all, so I was concerned abou it. However, it did dye my gloves orange. I dyed my eyebrows, too. My skin did not dye at all.

My hair started out bright orange, which I expected. However, 3 days later it still seems too orange to me, although it is definitely darker. I was hoping for a redder result, such as the color of Catherine's hair (the owner of this site).

I read your reply in this post with great interest, but I'm a little confused by something you said -- "Mixes made with lemon juice will continue to gradually darken over time, where as less acidic liquids like tea wont. Stronger acidic based liquids will also be slightly less orange the first couple of days and will darken less as they oxidize, where as less acidic liquids will be pretty orange and will seem to darken a good deal as they oxidize. " 

These 2 sentences seem to contradict each other. Let me rearrange your words a bit so you'll see what I mean -- "Mixes made with lemon juice will continue to gradually darken over time...Stronger acidic based liquids will ... darken less as they oxidize" -- I can't tell from these 2 statements whether the strong acid liquids like lemon juice will cause the hair to darken more over time, or less. 

Also you say "...less acidic liquids like tea wont [darken over time]. ...less acidic liquids will ... seem to darken a good deal as they oxidize." Once again, I'm not sure whether the less acidic liquids like tea will cause the hair to darken more over time, or less.

Sorry for all the confusion -- perhaps I just misread what you said. Could you please reply and let me know --

1. Does lemon juice/ACV cause hair to darken more over time, or less?

2. Does "darken" mean the hair becomes browner (a darker orange)? Or, does it mean the hair becomes redder? (My hair seems to be a darker orange).

2. Does lemon juice/ACV cause hair to be more orange, or less (after it oxidizes)?

3. Which would produce a redder (less orange / less brown) final result -- less acid tea, or more acid lemon juice/ACV?

4. Is there anything else that I could do to produce more red in my henna, and less orange/brown?

5. Is there a different brand or type of henna that will produce more red and less orange/brown?

6. Is it possible that I did not get full dye release, or that it demised too soon? Could this be indicated by the fact there was no stain on my hand? (And if this was the case, why then did it dye my hair?)

Thanks so much for your expertise. As a beginner, I need accurate information from experienced henna users! :)

 

 

_Rachel_
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Re: What to add to the mix

Cade,  

I was confused about the exact two points you describes in your post. I came here seeking info on the true differences between lemon and tea for dye release.

Did anyone ever answer your questions?  Not even a forum admin? 

Carrie
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Re: What to add to the mix

Lemon juice requires longer dye release time because it is more acidic. For dye resistant gray hair, the extra acidity may help. For chemically damaged hair, the extra acidity may be too drying. The color results will darken over time as ACWN said above.

Tea is less acidic, so dye release time will be faster, and it would be gentler on damaged hair but perhaps not as good on dye resistant gray hair. It does not (in my testing) darken quite as much as a more acidic mix.

Carrie
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Re: What to add to the mix

Lemon juice requires longer dye release time because it is more acidic. For dye resistant gray hair, the extra acidity may help. For chemically damaged hair, the extra acidity may be too drying. The color results will darken over time as ACWN said above.

Tea is less acidic, so dye release time will be faster, and it would be gentler on damaged hair but perhaps not as good on dye resistant gray hair. It does not (in my testing) darken quite as much as a more acidic mix.

marie
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Re: What to add to the mix

ACWN - Thank you! That was a big help. One more question: when people add essential oils, is it just for the smell or does it change anything else?

locsondoc
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Re: What to add to the mix

That was a helpful review and the eBook is worth reviewing. But I am looking for info about glossing and using zizyphus spina cristi for conditioning

Carrie
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Re: What to add to the mix

Here is our FAQ on glosses: 

http://forums.hennapage.com/node/21

Jen is a big fan of zizy so I'll defer to her advice.

Jen
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Re: What to add to the mix

 I wouldn't call what zizy does "conditioning." I find it leaves my hair a little softer, but lots of people do not. What it does for me is gives my thin, fine, stick straight hair a little fluff volume, and body. It helps my hair take a curl from rollers or curling iron a little bit too, which it never did before!

When I had hair a few inches past my shoulders I used about 25 grams of zizy with water, left to stand just a little while -less than an hour. I mix it pretty thin so that the 25 grams is enough to cover my hair. It feels a little slimy going on. Then I leave it in about 20 minutes and risne out. I find shampooing it out doen't lesson the effects and makes rinsing easier.

_Rachel_
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Re: What to add to the mix

Thanks for the info! The two, well four, previously mentioned statements were a little confusing.

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