Amla

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cagles
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Amla

I have a question about the amla.  Can it be added to the henna mixture AFTER the dye release, like right before you apply it to your head?

ACWN
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Re: Amla

Yeah, it can. If you're going to do it that way I would suggest something less acidic for your liquid instead of say lemon juice as it could be too acidic for your hair when coupled with the amla. Apple juice or an acidic tea like chamomile will work fine for this.

Vizion4B
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Re: Amla

I always add 2 tablespoons of Amla powder to 100 grams of Jamila BAQ henna along with spring water to a yogurt/paste consistency.  Allow it to sit 12 hours for dye release and then freeze until I'm ready to use it.  No acid is needed if you are going to add Amla powder.  Amla is acidic by itself. Too much acid will make your hair dry and brittle and it will take days or in some cases weeks for the moisture level to return to your hair shaft.

ACWN
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Re: Amla

Vizion -  we've actually found that it really doesnt matter when you put the amla in. You can put it in before dye release and use it as your acid, or you can put it in after dye release. Its simply a matter of if you want to wait 12 hours or not. Yes, too much acid would be drying, which is why I had suggested something less acidic such as apple juice or tea if cagles was going to add it after dye release.

Carrie
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Re: Amla

Megumi mixes her henna with lemon juice, AND adds amla after dye release.  You can see her salon clients' color with plant dyes on her facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/pages/Honolulu-HI/Megumi-Organic-Salon/133907238857?ref=ts

I think lemon juice can work fine for a lot of people, but if you find it doesn't then going with something less acidic is fine too.

Having something acidic in your mix is really helpful if you have trouble getting good color on gray.

cagles
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Re: Amla

Well since it is already "brewing" with lemon Juice"  (that is all I had here), It is probably a good call to leave it out.  So what would have worked best with the henna at the start....amla or lemon juice for the acid??

ACWN
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Re: Amla

They work equally well. Henna does best when there is some acid in the mix, doesnt really matter how much. Acid causes a slower dye release, which results in a slower dye demise. This means henna has time to properly bind to the hair and give its most permanent, intense color. Stronger acidic mixes, like with lemon, tend to last much longer and start out less orange. They oxidize a little less. Lesser acidic mixes, like with say tea, dont last near as long (though its plenty long enough for proper dyeing) and start out more orange. They oxidize a whole lot more, but in the end the color of a lemon juice mix and a tea mix will be the same after oxidation.

 

Amla is only ever really needed if you want to slightly cool down the orange tones of henna (typically for brown) or you have curl you want to keep. If neither of these apply to you, you really dont need it.

Carrie
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Re: Amla

Just in case anyone wonders, when ACWN is talking about "Lesser acidic mixes ... dont last near as long" etc ... she means the dye stays active in the paste for fewer hours. Your haircolor isn't going fade (much) no matter what, unless you use boiling water.

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